Derek Dye, Intern, Ejected By Umpire For Playing Three Blind Mice

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Pretty funny that they played 3 blind mice after a questionable call by the umpire!

CBS Philly

By Spike Eskin

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) – Derek Dye is spending the summer before his senior year at the University of Illinois interning for the Daytona Cubs. If an internship is supposed to offer you real world experience, Dye’s experience on Wednesday night was proof.

Dye was being given the chance to run the organ music during Wednesday night’s game. There was a questionable call at first base. “Looked like our first baseman caught it, and then lost it on the transfer. So you figure the call would be out,” Dye told 94WIP’s Marc Farzetta.

MARC FARZETTA’S INTERVIEW WITH DEREK DYE: LISTEN TO THE INTERVIEW

So Dye thought he’d have a little fun. “I played “Three Blind Mice,” knew organ tone, no lyrics, just the organ,” he said. “And then, within about four or five seconds of the song playing, the home plate umpire looks up, yells as loud as he…

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When the coach stops talking to you…

All players have to deal with the many ways their coaches communicate with them.  Young players get an early lesson on socialization and the juggle of dealing with all KINDS of people.  I think that’s one of the essential lessons of organized sports – communication skills are developed and trust systems are built.

Some coaches yell, some coaches have other coaches do the correcting, and some are passionate and speak slowly.  No matter the approach, if a coach is working to correct mistakes, at least there’s interest – it’s a good thing.  Where parents can come into play is to help the young player take bits and pieces and apply it…basically help them make some adjustments.

An old saying that I grew up hearing and believe to this day – if a coach is talking to you or making an example out of you, then it’s a good thing.  Be concerned when they ignore you.  Once they stop trying, it’s time to move on because they’ve given up or believe you have.  If adjustments aren’t made – their playing days will be numbered.

Lamorinda Baseball

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Just got word that the Lamorinda Spartans went 4-0 this past weekend in the 12U TPR July Classic. Proud of you boys!

Let’s get after it in practice this week.

The official roster is set for the 10U Knights — looking forward to working with the smaller group. Timing is everything. This week it’s discipline, keeping the double play in order, and communication. Control what you can. Hustle 1st!

Check them out on https://www.facebook.com/Lamorindabaseball and http://lamorindabaseball.org/

Shout out!

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I want to give a huge shout out to the Lamorinda Immortals, who competed in the East Cobb tournament in Georgia and finished 2nd. Although they didn’t win it all, they competed each game and continued to play well together. They’ve been working hard all summer, in the valley heat, preparing for the grueling tournament schedules.

Let’s keep grinding.
Keep up the good work!

Pay to Play

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2 more weeks of school left and I can’t wait for summer!  If you couldn’t tell from my earlier posts, I’m a fan of sunshine and baseball, what could be better?

I just missed the travel ball era.  Growing up in the 90’s and playing my most competitive ball in the past decade, the business of paying to play missed my peer group.  Besides the elite showcases such as Area Codes, or the Arizona showcase in Peoria (Mariner/Padres complex) and things like Team USA, there wasn’t a huge push to play beyond your all-star teams.  With talent spread thin and the level of competition differing league to league and within it, team to team, families and players are finding themselves having to seek out a competitive environment.

I’ll leave this as is right now…I’d love to hear from others about their experiences with the “pay to play” era.

Rain, Rain Go Away!

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While rain and baseball never go hand in hand – there actually are some benefits to the wintery, wet conditions. When it rains, unless you play in a dome, baseball, specifically in the Bay Area, comes to a stop….or does it?

Now that the role is reversed and I’m no longer the player yearning for extra BP (batting practice) or on the field ground balls, I understand the importance of gym days. It forces us coaches to push a pause on the fast life of the season and gives time to the important components of the game that can go untaught or better neglected…

Some quick and easy things to remember of those rainy gym days:

-Get your players in the weight room (They don’t need to pump large amounts. Let’s encourage them to use lower weight and higher reps – encouraging a good warm up routine with stretch bands, abdominal work to accompany them during the season).

-Great time to go over signs and defensive schemes (bunt D, pick offs)

-Don’t be afraid to go back to the fundamentals with everything emphasizing foot work and proper approach to fielding ground balls & fly balls.

Remember – small work is just as important as live BP and game situations…enhance what you say in the gym out on the field.

Happy April!